How to vote and what’s on the ballot in DC, Maryland and Virginia

(PHOTO: MGN Online)

(PHOTO: MGN Online)

WASHINGTON, D.C. — After a very long election season, the day is here!  Americans will cast ballots not only for the presidential race, but also for down-ballot Congressional races, local offices, and proposed state amendments.

VIRGINIA

If you are voting in Virginia, you need to present a valid photo ID. A full list of acceptable forms of ID can be found here. The polls will be open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Two proposed amendments are on the ballot, one of which concerns Virginia’s status as a “right to work” state. They can be read in full here.

Plenty of Congressional races and local races are on the ballot. Richmond is electing a new mayor, Democrat Donald McEachin will face Republican Mike Wade in the 4th District, and in the 10th District in wealthy Northern Virginia, Trump-opposing Republican Barbara Comstock is fighting a tight race to hold onto her seat against Democrat LuAnn Bennett.

A full list of state and local elections in Virginia can be found here. And you can find your polling place here.

D.C. 

The polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., but if you’re in line at your polling location by 8 p.m., you’re allowed to vote.

If you’ve voted in DC before, you don’t need to provide ID to vote by mail or in person. If you registered to vote by mail and you’re voting in DC for the first time, attach a copy to your mail ballot or bring one of the following to vote: A government-issued photo ID and a utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows your name and address.

Four wards in D.C. are electing new Board of Education members and new members of City Council. There will be a referendum on the ballot for the hotly contested issue of DC becoming a state, as well. More information can be found here. 

Find your polling place here.

MARYLAND

The polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., but if you’re in line at your polling location by 8 p.m., you’re allowed to vote.

If you’ve voted in Maryland before, you don’t need to provide ID to vote by mail or in person. If you registered to vote by mail and you’re voting in Maryland for the first time, attach a copy to your mail ballot or bring one of the following to vote: A government-issued photo ID and a utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows your name and address.

Baltimore is having a mayoral election, and so is Hagerstown. One Senate seat is up for grabs, though incumbent Democrat Chris Van Hollen has a solid lead in the polls. More information on state and local races is available here. And you can find your polling place here.

UPDATED: This article initially named McEachin’s opponent as Randy Forbes.